Controlling Moisture and Mold

Indoors, mold growth should be avoided.  Problems may arise when mold starts eating away at materials, affecting the look, smell, and possibly, with the respect to wood-framed buildings, affecting the structural integrity of the buildings.

Molds can grow on virtually any substance, as long as moisture or water, oxygen, and an organic food source are present.  Molds reproduce by creating tiny spores (viable seeds) that usually cannot be seen without magnification.  Mold spores continually float through the indoor and outdoor air.

Molds are usually not a problem unless mold spores land on a damp spot and begin growing.  They digest whatever they land on in order to survive.  There are molds that grow on wood, paper, carpet, foods and insulation, while other molds feast on the everyday dust and dirt that gather in the moist regions of a building.

When excessive moisture or water accumulates indoors, mold growth often will occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains uncorrected.  While it is impossible to eliminate all molds and mold spores, controlling moisture can control indoor mold growth.  Molds gradually damage building materials and furnishings.  If left unchecked, mold can eventually cause structural damage to a wood framed building, weakening floors and walls as it feeds on moist wooden structural members.

Contact David Brandt at 406-892-1717 or floodco@centurytel.net

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