Winter Safety In The Home

winter-safety

Winter storms may bring hazardous driving conditions and downed trees and power lines. It is important to prepare your home for the possibility of a power outage. When weather and driving conditions are severe, the best place to be is in your own home.

Assemble essential supplies

  • Flashlight
  • Batteries
  • Portable, battery-powered radio
  • At least one gallon of water per person
  • Small supply of nonperishable food
  • First Aid Kit

What to do during a power outage

  • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
  • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
  • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
  • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
  • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
  • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
  • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
  • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
  • Put on layers of warm clothing.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.
  • What to do during a power outage

    • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
    • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
    • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
    • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
    • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
    • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
    • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
    • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
    • Put on layers of warm clothing.
    • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.

    What to do during a power outage

    • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
    • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
    • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
    • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
    • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
    • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
    • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
    • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
    • Put on layers of warm clothing.
    • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.

    Contact David Brandt at 406-892-1717 or floodco@centurytel.net

Keep Your Homeowners Insurance Current

Homeowners insurance helps pay to repair or rebuild your home and replace personal property due to a covered loss. The term “homeowners’ policy” simply means you have a package policy that includes coverage (1) against the insured’s property being destroyed or damaged by various perils (causes of loss) and (2) coverage for personal liability exposures of the insured. A homeowners’ policy includes coverage for the residence premises, unattached structures, personal property and personal liability.

Personal Liability covers you for non-automobile related injuries to other people, or damage to their property, for which you are legally responsible. It also provides coverage for your defense in the event you are sued by the injured party. While a “homeowners’ policy” is the most common and the most desirable there are other property forms available.

There are various types of residential insurance including homeowner, condominium, renters and mobile home. All of these types provide property and liability coverage. The property coverage insures against perils such as water damage, fire, wind, hail, vandalism, and theft. The perils covered depend on the type of policy you purchase.

Contact David Brandt at 406-892-1717 or floodco@centurytel.net

Flood Cleanup by the EPA

During a flood cleanup, the indoor air quality in your home or office may appear to be the least of your problems. However, failure to remove contaminated materials and to reduce moisture and humidity can present serious long-term health risks. Standing water and wet materials are a breeding ground for microorganisms, such as viruses, bacteria, and mold. They can cause disease, trigger allergic reactions, and continue to damage materials long after the flood.

Contact David Brandt at Flood Co LLC, http://www.floodco.net/

floodco@centurytel.net or 406-892-1717