Winter Safety In The Home

winter-safety

Winter storms may bring hazardous driving conditions and downed trees and power lines. It is important to prepare your home for the possibility of a power outage. When weather and driving conditions are severe, the best place to be is in your own home.

Assemble essential supplies

  • Flashlight
  • Batteries
  • Portable, battery-powered radio
  • At least one gallon of water per person
  • Small supply of nonperishable food
  • First Aid Kit

What to do during a power outage

  • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
  • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
  • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
  • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
  • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
  • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
  • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
  • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
  • Put on layers of warm clothing.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.
  • What to do during a power outage

    • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
    • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
    • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
    • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
    • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
    • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
    • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
    • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
    • Put on layers of warm clothing.
    • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.

    What to do during a power outage

    • Keep the refrigerator and the freezer closed; an unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for at least a few hours. If you lose power and believe that the power will be out for a prolonged period of time, prepare a cooler filled with ice for your perishable foods.
    • If the power goes off while you are using appliances, turn them off immediately; by doing this, you reduce the risk of overloading their circuitry when the power comes back on.
    • Keep batteries and flashlights in a central, easily accessible location known to everyone.
    • Only use a flashlight for emergency lighting. Never use candles! They are a fire hazard.
    • Do not run a generator inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system.
    • Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors. Never use your oven as a source of heat. If the power may be out for a prolonged period, plan to go to another location (relative, friend, or shelter) that has heat to keep warm.
    • Use the phone for emergencies only. Listening to a portable radio can provide the latest information. Do not call 9-1-1 for information — only call to report a life-threatening emergency.
    • Have emergency cash on hand. Remember that automated teller machines (ATMs) may not work during a power outage.
    • Put on layers of warm clothing.
    • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe — even at a trickle — helps prevent pipes from freezing because the temperature of the water running through it is above freezing.

    Contact David Brandt at 406-892-1717 or floodco@centurytel.net

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